Sunday, 23 February 2014

The Secrets of Mia Danvers by Robyn DeHart





An interesting mystery and a dull romance.

Lady Mia Danvers lost her eyesight when she was young. Her family, having lost her father, the Earl, and having to leave the family's estates to the male next-of-kin, find themselves destitute. They make the reproachable decision to abandon Mia in a cottage bordering the estate of Alex, the Duke of Carrington, and move in with a wealthier cousin.

Years later, her mother dead, and her sisters comfortably married, Mia still lives forgotten in her cottage. 
One night, returning home, she witnesses Jack the Ripper committing a murder. Only Mia, being  blind, is a very peculiar witness.
As soon as it's safe, she runs to Alex's estate to report the crime.

The mystery is extremely compelling. The author did an amazing job giving us Mia's POV, considering she is blind. Mia experiences the world by touch, by sound, and most importantly, by smell. She could recognise the killer's scent anywhere, and now he is on the hunt for her.

I really couldn't feel the chemistry between Mia and Alex, though. For most of the book they frequently mention feeling lust for each other - to me it was told, not shown.

There was an awkward leap from lust to love, it felt unbalanced, somehow... There wasn't a natural progression. Alex feels a need to protect her, and Mia is attracted to him... and suddenly it's love?
Alex was too distant to be likable, and Mia was too absurdly defiant or meekly compliant, by turns.

Also, I don't know if it's just my copy, but I found the text to be littered with grammatical mistakes, odd syntax choices, and a few homophones instead of their correct counterparts.

Harder to ignore are the mistakes regarding form of address. Alex is often called Lord Carrington, when he should always be addressed as "Your Grace", and Mia is always addressed as Miss Danvers, when she should be addressed as "Lady Danvers". Both Alex and Mia start addressing each other by first name out of the blue, and in the company of others, which was also odd. This is inexcusable in a historical romance, it's basic research...

But the mystery is worthwhile, so give it a try!


Robyn DeHart's official site

Buy The Secrets of Mia Danvers

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