Tuesday, 14 June 2016

Roses and Rot by Kat Howard





I'll call this a manipulative story... and not as an endearment.
 With the main characters having been the target of their mother's abuse (psychological and physical) , I actually felt bad for not connecting with them.
Have I such a heart of stone, that neither a story with traits such as those, can touch me?

And that was what made me keep reading. I kept hoping to feel something...

And I did, in small bits. Mainly, during Imogen's stream of consciousness and during the fairy tales that she kept on writing and telling.
As for the rest?
For me it was rubbish. -_- 
This was what I wrote in one of my Booklikes updates at 30%:
 

"BUT, the other part, the so called actual STORY with its actual characters, it just feels like a draft. A draft in which the writer seems to be more determined in trying to define what it means to be an artist.
A story _ for me_ has to have something more, I'll call it texture, and this doesn't have it. Flat storytelling. Flat characters. Flat relationships. I
This here, makes me want to just DNF it immediately."


And at 40%: "I feel as if, if this book was a person, it would be a snobbish one, going over and over about the "arts".

The characters are as interesting as last week's bread... but with less substance. More like phantoms of last week's bread...

The relationships are created in the blink of an eye, as if the author couldn't waste her precious time on it. All about the arts, remember?

Then there's huge craters of plot holes: there's this character, who'll end up calling one of the sisters a whore because of her immediately hooking up with her mentor ( something with which I also ain't crazy about ), someone who we'll later find out was born in Fairie, and who supposedly spent her first seven years there. But then, later on she says that the first time she rode into Fairie she was fourteen.
Hello???

As for Melete, the place to which the sisters go live along with many, many others, to refine their art, I found it completely underwhelmed. The concept of it was too grand for the portrait of what we end up getting.
In the end, for me, this story had a great concept but a lousy execution.


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